1791 Supply and Co
1791 Lincoln Axe
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1791 Lincoln Axe

$200.00
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Description
The Legend of the Abraham Lincoln Axe:

"I distinctly recollect an occasion when I was in the blacksmith shop of one Joshua Miller of the village of New Salem aforesaid, when Mr. Lincoln came into said blacksmith shop, and after some conversation asked Mr. Miller to cut his (Lincoln's) initials in an iron wedge which he, Lincoln, then held in his hand, to which Mr. Miller replied he could not do it, as he was no scholar. Thereupon Mr. Lincoln said to said Miller: 'Let me have your hammer and cold chisel and I will cut them my-self.’ - Mr. John Q. Spears

According to legend, Abraham Lincoln lost the head of his axe while helping to construct a home for his neighbor Mentor Graham, Lincoln's surveying instructor. In 1885, an iron wedge with the initials “A.L.” was found while repairs were being made on a brick house near Menard County, Illinois.

The “A.L.” iron wedge is now housed at the National Museum of American History - but we know that life requires you to swing hard, and not lose your head. Therefore, 1791 has made a special edition axe to commemorate this special American. Our 1791 Supply & Co. Axe is made in partnership with Council Tool in Lake Waccamaw, North Carolina, a family owned business that has been producing top quality hand tools since 1886.

Continued in "Details".. Item #: BXAM236
Details
The axe head is forged from Made in U.S.A. alloy steel, selected for superior edge holding and strength, and sharpened by hand – and an experienced one at that – with fine grit abrasives and leather. Axes are drop forged for strength and toughness by hard working individuals who pour their experience, sweat and pride into their work, resulting in one of the best axes on the market today.

The hickory handle is produced with modern manufacturing methods but in a style and shape that evokes a time when axes were the livelihood of many hard-working folks.

They two pieces are securely joined to the head by a softwood wedge, crossed by steel wedges, working to maintain the integrity of the bond
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